Jump to content

What have you been reading recently?


Word-Kenning
 Share

Recommended Posts

Quote:
Non-native speakers of Latin

Wouldn't that be the whole world?

We read The Princess Bride in my English class. I thought it was a really fun book, with a funny (but totally false) frame story. It's also laced with interesting bits of satire, especially in the made-up frame story parts. Without the fabricated backstory, the book would lose a lot of depth and appeal. All in all, I liked it. It's better than the movie, though the movie is one of my favorites.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Fractal
Quote:
Non-native speakers of Latin

Wouldn't that be the whole world?

Now, yeah. Vergil wrote for Romans. I'm just saying, I think the Aeneid in translation might drag in a few spots. It's a deservedly classic epic poem, but in a dead language, and it's not the rollicking adventure yarn that the Odyssey is.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Originally Posted By: Andraste
Originally Posted By: Drew
I've been reading "A Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin



Crazy. Sporefrog and I are reading it too.

Good, but too much incest.:p


I'm halfway through it now! "A Clash of Kings" is waiting (book 2 in the series) next.

I've looked for the thread about Doug Adam's "The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy" and remembered some new author was supposed to write more since Adam's passing. Couldn't find the thread I wanted, but here goes anyhow...

I just finished reading "The Hitchhikers Trilogy" which is all 5 (yes, a 5 volume trilogy) volumes in 1 hardcover book. I've read and re-read all 5 but this is my 1st re-read of all 5 from start to finish in about a week. Adam's definately finished the whole HHG2TG series. Over. Done. Wonderful! Loved them all! But he FINISHED it!

Maybe there was some slight undocumented editing (in the compilation), but there are no loose ends to hang another series on. It would be an insult.

The "Adam's Universe" is still out there but if someone did try to soil it by new books I think I'd be offended.

Did any new ones get written or did Adam's fans squash them?

DON'T PANIC!
MK2 PANIC!
New author?: GAG

Oops. This from wikipedia:
And Another Thing...
Main article: And Another Thing... (novel)
It was announced on 17 September 2008 that Artemis Fowl author Eoin Colfer had been commissioned to write the sixth installment entitled And Another Thing... with Jane Belson, Adams' widow.[17][18]
The story begins as death rays bear down on Earth, and the characters awaken from a virtual reality. Zaphod picks them up shortly before they're killed, but completely fails to escape the death beams. They are then saved by Bowerick Wowbagger, the Infinitely Prolonged, who they agree to help kill. Zaphod travels to Asgard to get Thor's help. In the meantime, the Vogons are heading to destroy a colony of people who also escaped Earth's destruction, on the planet Nano. Arthur, Wowbagger, Trillian and Random head to Nano to try to stop the Vogons, and on the journey, Wowbagger and Trillian fall in love, making Wowbagger question whether or not he wants to be killed. Zaphod arrives with Thor, who then signs up to be the planet's God. He almost kills Wowbagger, but thanks to Random, he only loses his immortality, and gets married to Trillian. Thor then stops the first Vogon attack, and apparently dies. Meanwhile, Constant Mown, son of Prostetnic Jeltz, convinces his father that the people on the planet are not citizens of Earth, but are, in fact, citizens of Nano, which means that it would be illegal to kill them. As the book draws to a close, Arthur is on his way to check out a possible university for Random, when, during a hyperspace jump, he is flung across alternate universes, has a brief encounter with Fenchurch, and ends up exactly where he'd want to be. And then the Vogons turn up again.

The book was published by Penguin Books in the UK and Hyperion in the US on October 12, 2009. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hitchhiker's_Guide_to_the_Galaxy

They actually did it. Has anyone read this? Opinion?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, while the series begins and ends just fine the way Adams left it, he didn't consider it a complete and unalterable thing. He had mentioned thoughts about and maybe even concrete intentions regarding the sequel to Mostly Harmless, but then he died before writing anything.

 

—Alorael, who has not read and who has very little intention of reading Colfer's addition to the series. Maybe he'll pick it up one day, but he thinks it would be more worthwhile to reread the original series.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: {Cartouche}
Actually, while the series begins and ends just fine the way Adams left it, he didn't consider it a complete and unalterable thing. He had mentioned thoughts about and maybe even concrete intentions regarding the sequel to Mostly Harmless, but then he died before writing anything.


Wasn't some of his notes on the incomplete book published under the title The Salmon of Doubt? (hehe. Salmon. Did Salmon ever take the title "Doubtful Salmon"? I'm sure he did at one point...)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Jumaj
I am reading Terry Prattchet's Thief of Time, it is very good and funny, I love it, his books are always full of things that make me laugh for days and smile for months, Terry is my favourite writer.

Everybody here loves Terry Prachett. He's awesome.

Personally, I'm on a William Gibson binge, attempting to read Neuromacer, Count Zero, and Mona Lisa Overdrive at the same time.

I don't particularly care for his premise. Or his plots. Or his characters. But the man's writing style is very, very good.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I think Gibson's style is a huge part of his success; but I don't think it's a matter of writing poetic sentences or anything like that. Gibson has a knack for doing just enough too little exposition. He leaves the reader with enough of a gist of what's going on to keep reading, but with enough blurring at the edges to create a sensation of breathless speed. I don't think it's easy to manage this; I think it's a finely tuned thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Lilith
Originally Posted By: Dantius
I don't particularly care for his premise. Or his plots. Or his characters. But the man's writing style is very, very good.


this is like the exact opposite of what everyone else has ever said about gibson

Yes, because a plot about how "It's the future and Japanese superconglomerates are using private mercenary armies to control a cyberspace network" is such an original plot, Thuryl.

Although it may have been original when it came out(I don't remember myself). But still.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Dantius
Yes, because a plot about how "It's the future and Japanese superconglomerates are using private mercenary armies to control a cyberspace network" is such an original plot, Thuryl.

Although it may have been original when it came out(I don't remember myself). But still.
Well, Gibson is one of the fathers of cyberpunk, so yeah.

But I know what you mean. Someone reading Neuromancer without being aware of when it was written would roll their eyes and think "Man, what a ripoff of Ghost in the Machine. And eXistenZ. And The Matrix." It's the same reaction people have when they think Lord of the Rings is cliché fantasy.

(To pick another example that was recently mentioned, I was underwhelmed by Terry Pratchett's Small Gods. By the time I read it, I had consumed enough similar works so that it wasn't bringing up anything new for me.)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Dintiradan
But I know what you mean. Someone reading Neuromancer without being aware of when it was written would roll their eyes and think "Man, what a ripoff of Ghost in the Machine. And eXistenZ. And The Matrix." It's the same reaction people have when they think Lord of the Rings is cliché fantasy.

(To pick another example that was recently mentioned, I was underwhelmed by Terry Pratchett's Small Gods. By the time I read it, I had consumed enough similar works so that it wasn't bringing up anything new for me.)


Personally, I thought that it also had a lot of parallels to Blade Runner, most notably in the setting/atmosphere of the Japanese city in the beginning. Plus, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep predated Neuromacer by a good decade and a half.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote:
ten fake dollars says he actually meant Ghost in the Shell

Click to reveal..

canadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpgcanadian-tire-money.jpg

(Yep -- can you tell I have yet to watch/read it?)


I know Gibson isn't the first cyberpunk author (though I didn't know Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep was that much earlier), but I still think he was more pioneer than follower.

But hey, I'm not a huge reader of that genre, so if you know better than I, feel free to shoot me down.

(Now that I think about some more, that Tolkien hack was really ripping off Beowulf, wasn't he? ;-) )
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Finished "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and loved it. I'll get around to reading the somewhat derivitive "House of Spirits" sometime soon.

 

In the mean time, I'm on "Peace Like A River" and moving into "The Road" sometimes soon. To offset the heavy duty stuff, I've mixed in some occasional Carl Hiaasen and Jim Butcher.

 

It's all be very enjoyable. I suppose I'll slow down when I return to school and am deprived of a room of $1 books a block away, but my list is long enough to sustain me through much of the fall.

 

I gave up on Martin. I used to think willingness to kill off main characters was a sign of character in an author, but the man takes it too far. Besides, Feast for Crows was tolerable at best and Dance with Dragons is likely to be another decade.

 

Edit: But hey! Wheel of Time's looking worthwhile again. New book in Novemeber and my hopes are high.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote:
"One Hundred Years of Solitude"

Aaaaaaah! I do not have words for how much I hate that book.

I recently got some books from the local used book store's bargain shelves. These were 'Planet of the Voles', which, sadly, was merely mediocre and did not live up (or down) to its terrible sounding title, and 'Catastrophe's Spell' by Mayer Alan Brenner, which turned out to be a quite enjoyable fantasy book. It was with great pleasure that I discovered last weekend that the latter book is the first of a set of four, and that all four are freely available. So far I've read the second one, and I am saving up the remaining two.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OHYOS is indeed not for everyone, but I did like it. I like magic realism in general, because it takes advantage of the often overlooked fact that fiction is fiction.

 

I recently read Stardust by Neil Gaiman, and liked it. It's his version of a fairy tale, and he manages (more or less) to make a plot work despite the bizarre conditions of fairy tale magic.

 

Also, Regenesis by C.H. Cherryh. Man, do not bother with this one. It's Cherryh at her worst, rambling, inconsequential, pointless. A shame, because Cyteen was really interesting, though badly flawed by Cherryh's besetting inability to end a story comprehensibly.

 

And Heroes of the Valley by Jonathan Stroud, who wrote the Bartimaeus trilogy. This one gets two thumbs up. It's quite different from Bartimaeus. A sort of Viking saga with a young hero who speaks the unemotional prose of a Jack Vance protagonist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Lilith
i was going to say they're never witty but then i realised it read "librarians" and not "libertarians"


Eh, Heinlein came close. And I found Atlas Shrugged hilarious, but that probably wasn't intentional on the part of Rand. Speaking of which I should really get around to reading Anthem, since I've heard it's actually a passable good novel.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...