Jump to content

a dent in statistics


Recommended Posts

if you want to cheat on purpose, it's not too hard to learn how to flip a coin so that it'll probably land the way you want it to

 

edit: oh hey the article even mentions that. yeah, none of this is really too surprising in principle, although the rigorous physical treatment of it is kind of impressive i guess

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Nikki.
Originally Posted By: Ham is also A Piece of Pork

I found this out by watching Q.I. how odd...


Q.I. is the place I find most of my useless information these days. Also, Stephen Fry. <3
You both suck. I just wasted an hour watching Q.I. clips. Bloody show's worse than TV Tropes.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Student of Trinity
Even if the average over many people is 51%, I expect individual coin-flipping style is a factor.


I was once able to learn someone's style of flipping and guess it right at least 8/10 times.

Coin flipping is, in my opinion, one of the least random ways of making a decision, only barely better than 'eeny meeny miny mo'.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew some people who weren't satisfied with the randomness of coins for minor decision-making in life and used a d20 (with predefined ranges) instead. It was something of a spectacle, because when they couldn't decide on something, they'd pull out a very alchemical-looking bag, draw out a bright purple die, and roll it intently.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In one of the tabletop groups I tend to play in, we have a rogue who is Chaotic Neutral on the alignment scale. Any time he's faced with a moral quandary, he usually rolls a d20 to see if he does the "right" thing or does the selfish thing.

 

Pretty entertaining, but I couldn't see that turning out well in real life for some reason.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still haunted (okay, very mildly haunted) by the time I was running a D&D game, and a player who had spaced out during an important description deliberately had their character jump off a ridiculously high ledge. I let them have a saving throw to survive in some critical state, since this was a fantasy game, but ruled that they needed a 20.

 

The player asked me if they could survive by rolling exactly 17 instead, since 17 was their lucky number. I said okay. They rolled 17.

 

I snatched that die fast, and rolled it myself several times. No 17s for me.

 

Still.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is possible to throw dice so they give you whatever number you want. Then again, it also could've been sheer dumb luck.

Originally Posted By: Have at Three!
—Alorael, who apparently has a lot of indecision and is prone to sudden spontaneity.
Indecision is okay, but in order to be spontaneous, you need to fill out a request form in triplicate two months in advance. According to our records, you haven't filled out such a from since 1987.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Ephesos
In one of the tabletop groups I tend to play in, we have a rogue who is Chaotic Neutral on the alignment scale. Any time he's faced with a moral quandary, he usually rolls a d20 to see if he does the "right" thing or does the selfish thing.

Pretty entertaining, but I couldn't see that turning out well in real life for some reason.
Imagine Harvey Dent as a gamer.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Dintiradan
Originally Posted By: Ephesos
In one of the tabletop groups I tend to play in, we have a rogue who is Chaotic Neutral on the alignment scale. Any time he's faced with a moral quandary, he usually rolls a d20 to see if he does the "right" thing or does the selfish thing.

Pretty entertaining, but I couldn't see that turning out well in real life for some reason.
Imagine Harvey Dent as a gamer.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dice_Man

I just finished re-reading this. For those too lazy to click the link, "The Dice Man is a novel published in 1971 by George Cockcroft under the pen name Luke Rhinehart and tells the story of a psychiatrist who begins making life decisions based on the casting of dice."

It's actually a really good book too, if anybody was at a loss for some mid-November reading.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Randomizer
Originally Posted By: VCH
Seriously, you guys know people that use coins to make decisions, OMG

Well I would flip a credit card but I don't want it to wear out.
And I once tried to flip a house. Trust me, flipping coins is a lot easier, with the added benefit of not having to worry about flying bricks as the house spins in midair when you flip it.
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...