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Dikiyoba

A Break from Tradition

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Originally Posted By: Tyranicus
Not quite, there was a TV miniseries set in the same location many years after the books.


The miniseries was fairly decent (far better than I had dared hope, at least). After having grown up with a fair number of the Dinotopia books, I wish it had continued...

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Originally Posted By: Ephesos
Originally Posted By: Tyranicus
Not quite, there was a TV miniseries set in the same location many years after the books.

 

The miniseries was fairly decent (far better than I had dared hope, at least). After having grown up with a fair number of the Dinotopia books, I wish it had continued...

 

There was a short-lived TV series that picked up where the miniseries left off. It had none of the same actors, much lower production values, and terrible writing.

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Originally Posted By: Arrhinoceratops
Drinker is named after a paleontologist.
I don't think the feud between Othniel Marsh and Edward Drinker Cope was due to scientific rivalry. I think it was because each man was jealous of the other's facial hair. The Bone Wars could have been avoided if the two had just faced each other in a beard-off. Sandford Flemming would judge, of course.

Actually, you mentioning Cope reminded me of an educational show I watched about paleontology. No idea if it was on TV or not; I just got the VHSs out of the library, and they don't seem be in stock there anymore. The show was aimed at a younger audience, and had two hosts, both male. One had either blond or reddish hair, the other had dark hair. Possibly glasses on one or both, I don't remember.

Shows used a frame story for each episode, as I recall. One had one host travel around to different dig sites, trying to find a cure for the other host who was turning into a dinosaur (didn't find it in time). Another one had the two hosts reminiscing in a nursing home, and then they talked about the Ice Age.

And... that's pretty much all I remember about the show. My Google-Fu is weak tonight. If Dikiyoba or anyone else knows the show, I'd appreciate knowing the title.

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Originally Posted By: Arrhinoceratops
Bambiraptor got its name because it's adorably small.
I'll have to take your word for it. When I first saw the word "Bambiraptor," I got a horrible mental image of a hybrid between a white-tailed deer and a velociraptor. eek

Oh, and happy birthday, Dikiyoba!

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Im guessing that the good of the birthday was only able to cancel out the pokemon. The gourds still terrorize us with their...gourdliness? (Postcounts are not evil .)

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Originally Posted By: The Mystic
I'll have to take your word for it. When I first saw the word "Bambiraptor," I got a horrible mental image of a hybrid between a white-tailed deer and a velociraptor. eek

More like a combination between Velociraptor and a feather duster.

1bambiraptor3rk1.jpg

Originally Posted By: Master1
A birthday and a new post count!

Dikiyoba has been on SW for five years as of last week too.

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Originally Posted By: Arrhinoceratops
Originally Posted By: The Mystic
I'll have to take your word for it. When I first saw the word "Bambiraptor," I got a horrible mental image of a hybrid between a white-tailed deer and a velociraptor. eek
More like a combination between Velociraptor and a feather duster.
Thanks for helping me get rid of the horrid imagery. Still looks a bit freaky, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted By: Master1
A birthday and a new post count!

Dikiyoba has been on SW for five years as of last week too.
I guess this means that triple congratulations to our resident dikiyora.

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Originally Posted By: Arrhinoceratops
1bambiraptor3rk1.jpg


Clearly proof that birds evolved from dinosaurs. I had no idea that the predecessors to chickens were this menacing!

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Originally Posted By: Goldenking
Clearly proof that birds evolved from dinosaurs. I had no idea that the predecessors to chickens were this menacing!
Arent chickens evolved from T-rex?

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Originally Posted By: Tirien
Originally Posted By: Goldenking
Clearly proof that birds evolved from dinosaurs. I had no idea that the predecessors to chickens were this menacing!
Arent chickens evolved from T-rex?


you're thinking of white swans

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Originally Posted By: Tirien
Arent chickens evolved from T-rex?

Only if T. rex was capable of going back in time. And while we're discussing oddly-named raptors...

---

5. Fukuiraptor

Fukuiraptor is a medium-sized theropod. When a large, curved claw from it was originally discovered, it was thought to be part of the foot, making Fukuiraptor closely related to Velociraptor.

Actually: The large claw is actually part of the hand, and Fukuiraptor is related to Allosaurus.

Fukuiraptor.jpg

---

Dikiyoba.

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I remember fondly the dinosaur mod for Civilization II. It really was an excellent mod, and the dinosaurs were fun to "research," "build" and fight with. They made great noises.

 

-S-

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Originally Posted By: Synergy
I remember fondly the dinosaur mod for Civilization II. It really was an excellent mod, and the dinosaurs were fun to "research," "build" and fight with. They made great noises.

-S-


This makes me sad that I didn't jump on the Civilization bandwagon until Civ3.

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Tyranicus, I am confident you would have enjoyed the "Dinosaurs!" mod. The problem with computer games compared to, say, a board game or a book, is that when you get nostalgic, it's really hard to go back and revisit old favorites for fun. smirk

 

I still play Civ III mods, though the vanilla game is too boring for me to play undoctored. I play the fullblown Ancient Mediterranean mod and the Camelot! mod in particular. You get some dinos in the Warhammer Fantasy mod, come to think of it. You get a mounted dino rider called a "Cold One." They're very bitey.

 

Oh, and dragons too. They're insanely powerful endgame units.

 

-S-

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6. Parasaurolophus

 

Parasaurolophus was a large hadrosaur with an elongate crest protruding backwards from its head. It was aquatic and the crest was used as a snorkel or as air storage during dives.

 

Actually: Parasaurolophus was terrestrial. No one is sure what the crest was for, but it's likely that it was a brightly colored display to communicate with other members of its species and/or as a way to amplify sounds.

 

new_parasaurolophus.jpg

 

Dikiyoba.

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Originally Posted By: Tyranicus
Unfortunately, I have tasted that which is Civilization V, and I cannot go back. tongue


Would it be safe for me to go from Civ III to Civ V (skip IV) without much of a learning curve?

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Originally Posted By: Rowen
Originally Posted By: Tyranicus
Unfortunately, I have tasted that which is Civilization V, and I cannot go back. tongue


Would it be safe for me to go from Civ III to Civ V (skip IV) without much of a learning curve?

I would say so. It's pretty easy to learn the basics.

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I had no previous experience with the series before buying V, but like Tyran said, it doensn't really take all that long to pick up the essentials.

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Originally Posted By: Synergy
I remember fondly the dinosaur mod for Civilization II. It really was an excellent mod, and the dinosaurs were fun to "research," "build" and fight with. They made great noises.

-S-


Definitely. I agree wholeheartedly with this, and wish it were still possible to play Civ II on any of my computers.

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7. Sauroposeidon

 

Sauroposeidon was a large sauropod closely related to Brachiosaurus. Occasionally it is heralded as the largest known dinosaur.

 

Actually: Only a few bones of Sauroposeidon are known, so all measurements are estimates. However, while it is currestly the tallest known dinosaur, the overall largest known dinosaur is another sauropod called Argentinosaurus.

 

Dikiyoba.

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Originally Posted By: Sauroposeidon
7. Sauroposeidon


Is that what you get when you cross a Dark Lord with a Greek god, because-

Ah, screw it. My heart isn't in it right now...

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Originally Posted By: Sauroposeidon
Argentinosaurus.


I bet it got its name from Argentina. *googles* Score one for capitan obvious.

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Originally Posted By: Dantius
Originally Posted By: Sauroposeidon
7. Sauroposeidon


Is that what you get when you cross a Dark Lord with a Greek god, because-
Great, next time I reread Lord of the Rings, I'll be imagining Sauron as a dinosaur.

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Originally Posted By: Tirien
Great, next time I reread Lord of the Rings, I'll be imagining Sauron as a dinosaur.

You make it sound like that's a bad thing instead of an awesome thing. tongue

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Tolkien, philologist that he was, was surely aware of that Sauron meant lizard in Greek. But he used names for their sense and feeling and not their literal pedigree: witness Gandalf, whose name appears along with many others from _The Hobbit_ in the Prose Edda: but as a sort of dwarf.

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Originally Posted By: Tirien
Great, next time I reread Lord of the Rings, I'll be imagining Sauron as a dinosaur.

It certainly helps explain where he got the fell beasts, doesn't it?

Dikiyoba.

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Actually, the traditional observed parallel is with the valkyries, who rode terrible winged beasts as well as horses and who were not originally seen in the positive light that they are today.

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Originally Posted By: CRISIS on INFINITE SLARTIES
Tolkien, philologist that he was, was surely aware of that Sauron meant lizard in Greek. But he used names for their sense and feeling and not their literal pedigree: witness Gandalf, whose name appears along with many others from _The Hobbit_ in the Prose Edda: but as a sort of dwarf.


But it means a magic elf.

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Originally Posted By: Slartucker
Actually, the traditional observed parallel is with the valkyries, who rode terrible winged beasts as well as horses and who were not originally seen in the positive light that they are today.

You're right. Dinosaur Sauron stealing the fell beasts from the valkyries is much more interesting.

---

8. Oviraptor

Oviraptor was a small, feathered therapod. It is almost always depicted with a tall crest on its head.

Actually: Oviraptor was probably crestless. The dinosaur with the head crest is actually the closely related Citipati.

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It was named for being found on a pile of eggs thought to belong to another species. It turns out they were probably that dinosaur's eggs. And, to make things more confusing, the paleontologists now seem to believe that the dinosaur ate eggs after all, although neither exclusively nor even primarily.

 

—Alorael, who always wonders how, exactly, these fossils happen. Did a migrating tar pit get the nest and oviraptor in passing?

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Originally Posted By: Now with 90% more 2011
—Alorael, who always wonders how, exactly, these fossils happen. Did a migrating tar pit get the nest and oviraptor in passing?

Basically, a critter has to get buried before something noms on it or it rots, and then getting crushed by pressure. Possibilities include being buried by ash or a mudslide, among other things.

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Quote:
—Alorael, who always wonders how, exactly, these fossils happen. Did a migrating tar pit get the nest and oviraptor in passing?

Probably a sandstorm. Whether the sandstorm was migrating or just taking a stroll is anyone's guess, though.

Dikiyoba.

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Originally Posted By: Oviraptor
Probably a sandstorm. Whether the sandstorm was migrating or just taking a stroll is anyone's guess, though.


Sandstorms are non-migratory!

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9. Thecodontosaurus

 

Thecodontosaurus was very small, bipedal prosauropod. It, like many other prosauropods, was omnivorous.

 

Actually: Thecodontosaurus and other prosauropods were herbivores. The confusion stems from the fact that prosauropods probably descended from carnivores and had sharp teeth that were capable of tearing meat (in fact, Thecodontosaurus had teeth that resembled those of a monitor lizard). However, studies of prosauropod skulls show that their jaw muscles were suited for vegetation, not meat.

 

amazing_fun_ecology_2002003170530371320_

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Originally Posted By: Ephesos
Originally Posted By: Oviraptor
Probably a sandstorm. Whether the sandstorm was migrating or just taking a stroll is anyone's guess, though.


Sandstorms are non-migratory!


Perhaps if you put it on a line...

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Originally Posted By: Ephesos
Originally Posted By: Oviraptor
Probably a sandstorm. Whether the sandstorm was migrating or just taking a stroll is anyone's guess, though.


Sandstorms are non-migratory!

African sandstorms are non-migratory, but what about European sandstorms?

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10. Ouranosaurus

 

Ouranosaurus was a large, bipedal ornithischian. It has tall spines on the top of its vertebrae. This was traditionally interpreted as a sail on its back.

 

Actually: The vertebral spines were thick and stiffened with tendons, indicating that Ouranosaurus had a hump on its back like modern-day bison rather than a sail.

 

Dikiyoba.

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Every time I read about the cool dinos I think of Granius. "Hah! Now that's how you archaeology!"

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Originally Posted By: Ouranosaurus
10. Ouranosaurus

Ouranosaurus was a large, bipedal ornithischian. It has tall spines on the top of its vertebrae. This was traditionally interpreted as a sail on its back.

Actually: The vertebral spines were thick and stiffened with tendons, indicating that Ouranosaurus had a hump on its back like modern-day bison rather than a sail.

Dikiyoba.


A sail? I can't imagine how that would be at all biologically beneficial... What made people suspect it was a sail?

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Originally Posted By: Rowen
Every time I read about the cool dinos I think of Granius. "Hah! Now that's how you archaeology!"


It's obvious... Granius is a time-traveler who named all of these dinosaurs!

It would explain so much!!!

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Originally Posted By: Goldenking
Originally Posted By: Ouranosaurus
10. Ouranosaurus

Ouranosaurus was a large, bipedal ornithischian. It has tall spines on the top of its vertebrae. This was traditionally interpreted as a sail on its back.

Actually: The vertebral spines were thick and stiffened with tendons, indicating that Ouranosaurus had a hump on its back like modern-day bison rather than a sail.

Dikiyoba.


A sail? I can't imagine how that would be at all biologically beneficial... What made people suspect it was a sail?
To make it look bigger, I would guess. Of course, prolly the same function as the hump...

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Originally Posted By: Goldenking
A sail? I can't imagine how that would be at all biologically beneficial... What made people suspect it was a sail?

Several pelycosaurs from the Permian period clearly had sails on their backs. Dimetrodon is the most famous. The sails were probably used for thermal regulation and/or sexual selection.

Dikiyoba.

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