Jump to content

What have you been reading recently?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 2.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Based on the fact that this topic has over 1.5 million views, everyone's answer should be "What have you been reading recently?"

The topic is dead! Long live the topic!   —Alorael, who will throw in The Ringmaster's Daughter, a relatively normal and therefore still quite unusual novel by Jostein Gaarder. Unlike Sophie's Wor

It was in one of the introductions for a book. Part of the problem was he had a few children and was trying to save for their future educations.   The figure I've seen is that a basic paper back

I got bored pretty quickly, myself, so all I found was Harold Bloom's list, but it really doesn't look that bad at all. In fact: Two of the people I mentioned are on that list. He also lists Italo Calvino, and Calvino's a definite for Italian literature. Cortázar is also happily mentioned. To Bloom's credit: He does mention the difficulty that more modern literature poses to such cataloging. (Although I think it should be noted that older works are less difficult because more of the 'competition' has been forgotten.)

 

Of course, I'd personally have some additions I'd like to make... perhaps starting with the French. After all: To begin with, he's completely ignored the Surrealists.

 

The German list is also painfully short.

 

There're also a couple of Polish writers I'd add in there; Poland is ignored.

 

But I suppose it really is sort of pointless to try to find a comprehensive list of books and authors that are deemed important by some confirmed majority of "respected" critics. Besides all of the variables involved there: I'm not confident there can really be any near-global agreement on any specific list, so it would be hard to use it as a definitive source to lay all of one's canon-judgments upon.

 

For so many years I've been saying "the Canon needs to be changed." But... now I really am starting to think not only that the Canon should be eliminated entirely but that it can be eliminated.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

(Youpi for reading on the bus!)

 

George Orwell - 1984

What can I say? Good. Read it.

 

Michael Crichton - Next

This isn't meant to be a standard novel. Crichton jumps from plotline to plotline for each chapter, and most arcs last two to three chapters. He does a decent job of interweaving them. It's not really character driven, as most characters are present for a chapter or two, but the ones that last longer are good. Dave was suitably disturbing, though Gerard was a bit over the top. Crichton ends the book with an author's note, detailing what he thinks about genetic research in the States (much of the novel uses unreliable narrators, so it's possible - though not likely - to miss his point). All in all, one of Crichton's best works.

 

Michael Crichton - The Terminal Man

Crichton putting his M.D. to work. A fictional glimpse into a research hospital. The subject matter doesn't seem that avant-garde, and then you realize the book was written in 1972.

 

William Gibson - Neuromancer

With regards to setting and atmosphere, this book is brilliant (it is one of the granddaddies of cyberpunk, after all). The whole cultural mishmash is great, though it's par for the course nowadays (I kinda wish more of the plot took place in Night City instead of The Sprawl and Freeside). However, the novel suffers in the character department. Pretty much all the characters lack any real personality and/or motivation (I know it's intentional for Armitage and Wintermute, but still...). For instance, Maelcum just sits there for most of the book. The characters seem to woodenly follow the predetermined script, and other than Case, most don't really have a good reason for doing what they do (I'd always assumed Molly was paid to jump Case's bones first thing). Is it worth reading the rest of the Sprawl Trilogy?

 

The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul - Douglas Adams

Meh. If you want great Adams, read the first two books of the Hitch Hiker Trilogy. I don't know if it's the setting or the subject matter, but this book just didn't do it for me like the aforementioned books did. It's not just a change in taste; I reread The Restaurant at the End of the Universe a while back and enjoyed it just as much. The climax and resolution for the book was also weird. It just ends, the central problem solved. We aren't told how it was solved, or what the repercussions of certain events were. The book just comes to a sudden halt.

 

Now I'm on Lee Strobel, though I might start doing homework on the bus rides soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really liked Neuromancer. I guess I figured most of the characters were all living in dead ends, even before they got mixed up in the scheme, so maybe what struck you as woodenness just seemed in character to me. It's a sort of spiritually dystopian novel.

 

But Count Zero is definitely worth reading. It's one of my favorite books, and has perhaps my favorite first sentence of all. Mona Lisa Overdrive was not as good, but it had some cool parts, and it's nice to see a sort of wrap-up. The short story collection set in the same world, Burning Chrome, is also well worth reading. On the whole it's about as gloomy as Neuromancer, whereas CZ and MLO are more upbeat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I find myself waiting for the fifth installment of Star Trek: Titan. I just read the first four novels during summer (I've read Kafka on the Shore and A Small Death in Lisbon along the way, too - it was a great and long vacation) and I was truly amazed at how much it felt like revisiting the awe and wonder Star Trek had bestowed on me when I was young. I should recommend the series to anyone who's into Trek.

 

If you're not, though, don't bother.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really think I'm a hell of an odd fish, here. How many people here are not into fantasy or sci-fi?

 

I mean... I love mythology and folktales of all sorts (whence my name)... but I've never been able to get very much into fantasy. Nor sci-fi. I loved watching those old re-runs of Dr. Who when I was a kid... and Douglas Adams (which doesn't really qualify)... that's about it. I liked Vonnegut's Sirens of Titan, but that doesn't exactly qualify either, I don't think. Dune definitely qualifies... i think I mentioned reading that one when I was a kid, after I saw David Lynch's Dune (which I still think was unfairly panned).

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a lot of genres from sci-fi and fantasy through pulp fiction mysteries and detective stories through mythologies, adventures and humor. It's mostly whatever strikes my fancy at the time and if the author is good. I've been known to track down everything that an author wrote if I like him or her enough.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Given that these boards cater to the players of fantasy and fantasci-fi roleplaying games, I'd say not liking the genres probably puts you in a minority.

 

—Alorael, who now wants to know what you do read for pleasure. The aforementioned myths and folktales? Mainstream literary fiction? Mysteries? Nonfiction?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Partial list of past reading:

 

Mythologies - Greek, Roman, Nores, Finnish, Summerian, Egyptian (including the Book of the Dead), Indian (Both India and North American)

 

Folktales - Jewish, Russian, Brothers Grimm, Sholom Aleichem

 

Middle English literature - Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

 

Humor - anything by Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, P. G. Wodehouse. Sam Levinson, Alan King, James Thurber

 

Pulp Fiction - Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe, Dashell Hammett, John D. McDonald, Donald Hamilton's Matt Helm series. Ian Fleming's James Bond, Ross MacDonald, Sax Rohmer (Fu Manchu and others)

 

Rudyard Kipling and some Rider Haggard

 

Fantasy - J. R. R. Tolkien, Lord Dunsany, L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, John Myers Myers' [i[silverlock[/i] and The Moon's Fire-Eating Daughter, Fritz Leiber

 

Sci-Fi - Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlien, Arthur C. Clark, Douglas Adams, Robert Aspirin, Terry Brooks,Steven Brust Lois McMasters Bujold, Glen Cook, Rick Cook, Brian Daley, John DeChancie, Gordon R. Dickinson, Alan Dean Foster,Dennis L. Mckiernan, Larry Niven, H. Beam Piper, Jerry Pournelle, Joel Rosenberg, Christopher Stasheff, Roger Zelazny ...

too numerous to mention

 

Non-fiction - used to read anything on Mid-East, Greek, and Roman archeology, Thor Hyerdahl, astronomy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alorael:

While a good sense of my taste can be assumed through the top link at the bottom of my posts... here are some of my more favorite authors (in no special order) :

 

Living: Ben Marcus, Gary Lutz, Shelley Jackson, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, Peter Handke, Laird Hunt, Jane Unrue, Brian Evenson, Mark Z Danielewski...

 

Dead: Witold Gombrowicz, Andrei Bely, Franz Kafka, Gertrude Stein, Kathy Acker, Walfgang Borchert, Italo Calvino, Donald Barthelme...

 

 

As for mythology: Irish (folktales, faerie lore, the Táin), Welsh/British (the Mabinogian), Greek, Native American (which is all folktales), Norse (what's left of it, and so far only a couple of the sagas, well, three sagas)...

 

I've stayed away from the Arthurian Tales so far because I want to find "the collection" that's the least maligned by Christianity... although that's probably impossible if not a contradiction. Actually, what I want is to read the original "tales", and so far I've only found a scrap that features Merlin's distaste for the invading Saxons and their Christian monks (I'm sure these tales were updated frequently... word of mouth, of course), and a typically very bloody story in The Mabinogian. I'm not sure how far back the tales of King Arthur extend, but at some point the invading Christians seem to have gotten a hold of those stories and... well... Christianized them.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Evnissyen, I got into sci-fi since my father was a huge fan and would virtually gobble up everything remotely sci-fi. When I got older my favourite room in the house was in the basement in an armchair next to a stove. It was also the room where all his sci-fi novels were stored. Once in a while I fall back into this old habit. It's my way of relaxing and switching my mind off.

 

I usually read other stuff, though. And I've been an anti-canonist all through university, even though I think every student of English Literature should read Chaucer and Shakespeare and Johnson, but not Hardy. Definitely not Hardy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Evnissyen

I've stayed away from the Arthurian Tales so far because I want to find "the collection" that's the least maligned by Christianity... although that's probably impossible if not a contradiction. Actually, what I want is to read the original "tales", and so far I've only found a scrap that features Merlin's distaste for the invading Saxons and their Christian monks (I'm sure these tales were updated frequently... word of mouth, of course), and a typically very bloody story in The Mabinogian. I'm not sure how far back the tales of King Arthur extend, but at some point the invading Christians seem to have gotten a hold of those stories and... well... Christianized them.


It was the Norman French influence about the 1400s that wanted to bring the French romatic influence to the original stories. Thus you get the introduction of Lancelot and the romance with Guinevere added on to the plot. The original stories were about the Welsh fighting the Saxons. I wish I could remember the title of a book looking at historical Arthur where the author tried to determine the tribal ancestry based up the names and locations of the known battles mentioned in the tales.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Uncovering pre-Christian proto-versions of the Arthurian cycle is an interesting project, but probably doomed, for two basic reasons. Firstly, anything pre-Christian is really old, so there just isn't much evidence to be found, for anything. People with axes to grind can no doubt spin up all sorts of stuff nonetheless (yee-ha!), but it's going to have an enormously high hooey content. And secondly, much of this material simply is Christian; quite possibly all. Like it or not, Christianity is not some johnny-come-lately ideology cooked up by televangelists in the 1980s and applied like a thin coat of hair gel over all kinds of rich pagan goodness.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was deep into Arthurian legend at one point, and I'd suspect that there wasn't anything that you could really call pre-Christian Arthurian legend. The core story of King Arthur is that he fought off the Saxons in roughly the 6th century. That means that Arthur was a Roman just after the collapse of the Empire and would've been a Christian. If you postulate an antecedent story (or historical figure), you'd have to change the core plotline so much that it wouldn't really be King Arthur anymore.

 

Now, that said, the Holy Grail bit wasn't always there, and the same with many of the other Christian additions. I think Geoffrey of Monmouth's version (the earliest standard, before Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur) didn't have a lot of that stuff, though (if I'm reading Wikipedia right) Chretien de Troyes included it later in the same century.

 

Then again, the story has also been fused with a lot of pagan traditions over the years (Bran the Blessed, etc.), so it hasn't just been growing more Christianized.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The author I read postulated that Uther and Arthur were from a tribe up near the Scotland border that were displaced south by the Vikings. This explains the names not being of Welsh origin. This tribe by not being related to those in Wales was able to unite them against the Saxons.

 

I've seen the speculation that Arthur was Roman and that their military training was what lead to the success against the Saxons.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're into Arthur, and haven't already, you should check out the old trilogy by Mary Stewart, which starts with The Crystal Cave. It's told in the first person by Merlin, but it's not really a fantasy version. The only magic is basically psychological, visions and trances and prophecies, which Merlin does consider supernatural, but which could all be considered natural from a modern viewpoint. It's still a fascinating story.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Locmaar:

Which Johnson, again?

 

That reminds me... I forgot to put Bryan Stanley Johnson on my list. (Better known as B.S. Johnson. If you've read his stuff you'll know why he used that abbreviation.) I also forgot the brilliant Eugene Ionesco... and I'm sure I've missed others, but I'm not gonna bother again trying to name them all.

 

Anyhow, it's cool when your mother or father owns a library that you can go and discover things in... in my case it was my father. He introduced me to Kafka when I was 14, I think. Since then I've never been the same.

 

As for King Arthur... The Mabinogion seems to connect him with the Welsh (since the Mabinogion are Welsh tales)... but if I remember correctly there's some confusion about just how involved the Britons were in Wales at that time. I think that, at that time, it was Briton territory. (I really have to go back into that book, again. I suppose I should also look into the history of those islands.) The names are all Welsh. Arthur is also apparently a Welsh name.

 

These old tales are really, really violent and bloody. Both the Welsh tales and Ulster cycle now known as the Táin Bó Cuailnge (pronounced TOIN bo KOOLinga).... Apparently the Celts really, really loved warfare.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Embarrassed as I am - I meant Ben Jonson, not Johnson (that's the track- and-field cheat), but I would also recommend B. S. Johnson. Christie Malry's Own Double Entry was a blast.

 

Since nobody reacted to my Hardy-bashing, I'll comment on it myself. I can see why one would want to read him, e.g. to get a better idea of or even a feeling for the impact the dawn of industrialization had on people in rural England, as well as a closer look at the hipocrisy of Victorian middle-class bigots.

 

His achievements in and for English Literature might be disputed, his style disliked. I was bored out of my wits by his drool as I am not interested in reading a 500 page novel about the afore-mentioned. To me he is a good case for arguing against any form of canon in literature.

 

As for the Celts: there is a great album by Test Department and Brith Gof called Gododdin. It is an attempt at recording the battle of Catraeth where 300 Celtic warriors were annihilated by an army of 100,000 Romans, as related by Aneirin in Y Gododdin, which is believed to be the earliest poem in the Welsh language. Listening to the record feels like stumbling across the battlefield.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh, somebody who's familiar with B.S. Johnson.

 

Christie Malry was a good book... personally my favorite was Albert Angelo. There're still a couple of his works I've been looking for. They're not easy to find.

 

On Thomas Hardy... He really is duller than dull. I suppose he must be important, historically, for something; don't press me on that, though. The human mind generally does not grasp onto anything it does not find stimulating... so it's no wonder so little of his work remains memorable.

 

While he might've had something important to say, I do remember it being fully obscured (no pun intended) by his incredibly tiresome writing style.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hardy's novels aren't my favorite either, but his poetry is wonderfully dark and funny.

 

—Alorael, who has recently read something that is not a book, and definitely not literature. It is, however, hilarious, and it is the first Google result for "worst fanfiction ever." Getting through more than a couple of chapters may cause permanent impairment, however, and it's not quite safe for work. Or anyone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A few months ago, I re-read all the works of David Eddings. It was interesting to see how my perception of them changed in the past six years: They still are nice, but a lot of it is just deliberate cliche or repetitive jokes.

The sad part is that in the midst of all-powerful deities duking it out (I blame the Belgariad for more than half of the omnipotence fantasies I had in middle school), Eddings occasionally lets some deeper ethical or philosophical thought shine through, which is then gagged as if not to overtax the reader. Interestingly, this is absent from his earlier work High Hunt, which makes it better in my opinion.

So in summary, I wish he didn't feel the need to dumb it down. I enjoyed reading it, but more in the way I enjoy Donald Duck cartoons than Lord of the Rings. At least Tolkien's clichéd good-vs-evil was set off by the conlang and background; in the Belgariad, there are about only a handful of words in a fictional language and none of them get translated.

 

After Eddings, I binged on Diana Wynne Jones for weeks. So far, I'd only read Dark Lord of Derkholm, Howl's Moving Castle and Dogsbody; now I read all the rest.

 

Wish I hadn't, I think. The books I had already read (and their sequels) were the very best. The Chrestomanci stories quickly got repetitive. Chrestomanci is a deus ex machina, repeatedly saving the day throughout the space-time-continuum, from Italian civil war to witch-hunts in Britain. The central theme of several of the stories is also carbon-copied - one of the main characters is unwittingly being used by his sister for nefarious purposes, while another two suffer the same from their uncles (the "long-assumed close confidant secretly being a villain" archetype is almost universal in Jones' works).

 

The stories are rather captivating on their own - though they have the unfortunate tendency to really muddle up the plot towards the end of the book, which left me confused until the ending came with a barrage of stunning and confusing revelations. The series I liked (Derkholm and Castle) fell victim to the same, but it was not too bad. The worst of them were The Time of the Ghost and Archer's Goon, which (deliberately, of course) left the reader in the dark for the entire time. This works in crime novels, because you have some idea of what's happening (this guy's dead, it had to be done with a gun). In fantasy, where the explanation is summed up as "Magic", the confusion is much worse.

 

After that, I finally started reading the rest of the Barocque Cycle. I'm getting fairly tired now (I've written on this for an hour, and I have a bad cold anyway), so I won't go into detail on that. I really loved The Confusion though, and I'm about a quarter into The System of the World.

 

I suppose it's strange that I don't like being confused by Diana Wynne Jones, but enjoy the at times tricky challenge of unraveling the story by Neal Stephenson. Perhaps it's because I can be sure that the latter won't end with "and poof, the two mysteriously split probability timelines were magically merged into one again". If Stephenson drives the plot into the ground, he has to dig it out himself, Enoch Root or no Enoch Root.

 

Suffice to say that a week ago I started reading Thomas Paine and various books about 18th century history, and this is a direct consequence of reading the Cycle. smile

 

Edit: I recall it was Alorael who first got me into Cryptonomicon. Thank you so much, Alo.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Arancaytar
A few months ago, I re-read all the works of David Eddings. It was interesting to see how my perception of them changed in the past six years: They still are nice, but a lot of it is just deliberate cliche or repetitive jokes.
The sad part is that in the midst of all-powerful deities duking it out (I blame the Belgariad for more than half of the omnipotence fantasies I had in middle school), Eddings occasionally lets some deeper ethical or philosophical thought shine through, which is then gagged as if not to overtax the reader. Interestingly, this is absent from his earlier work High Hunt, which makes it better in my opinion.


I loved David Eddings in middle school. He was the first fantasy author I ever read. Now though, I realize that every fantasy novel he writes is the same. I was able to stand that the Belgariad/Malloreon and Elenium/Tamuli had basically the same plot because Elenium/Tamuli had such interesting characters, and Redemption of Althalus had some refreshingly new ideas, even if most of it was rehashing older books. However, I was never able to read the Dreamers series beyond halfway through the first book. He just took all his previous fantasy works, and decided to make a new one from an amalgamation.

I'm glad to see that someone else out there enjoys High Hunt. Have you read Regina's Song? That's probably my favorite of his books.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Aran
After that, I finally started reading the rest of the Barocque Cycle. I'm getting fairly tired now (I've written on this for an hour, and I have a bad cold anyway), so I won't go into detail on that. I really loved The Confusion though, and I'm about a quarter into The System of the World.

 

They are an enjoyable read, and somewhat well researched. I need to re-read them sometime.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On my way to apply for a job, I passed a bookstore and noticed that their display of recommended books had a single copy of Orcs by someone named Stan Nicholls. Intrigued by the cover quote "Buy now or beg for mercy later," I purchased it, and stayed up till midnight reading the whole thing. Overall, I highly recommend it, particularly since I think there'd be a large overlap between people who like Avernum and people who would like this book. Do be warned, though: I have never read anything more tasteless in my life (and that includes Portnoy's Complaint.)

 

As for what I will be reading, I just checked out thirteen books from my local library. The only one anyone here would be likely to recognize is Darkly Dreaming Dexter (the source material for a certain TV show), though I think some of you might know the Otherland trilogy by Tad Williams. Before I read any of that, though, I need to make fifty-five flashcards and write ten one-paragraph essays due Monday for my history class.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great, Alo. Reading this made me wanna tear my eyes out. I might even consider reading some Hardy now. Maybe he will be able to erase the memory. My Immortal... aaaaahhh.

 

I especially like the name and its meaning. Raven is explained, but what about Dementia?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the story, actually. Her total distortion of language (not to mention how well it rips modern culture) is truly amazing at times. The vast majority of "professional" authors aren't nearly as interesting as this....

 

Were I a publisher I would want to put this work into print... except I fear she might not have actually meant it as a satire.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a work of satire whether or not it was intended to be. I wouldn't go so far as to say it's great writing, but it's definitely great in the same way that watching calamities on YouTube can be.

 

—Alorael, who is now even more convinced that there is deliberate malice behind that piece after seeing that it's been published. Among other things, it now has to be satire or it's copyright violation.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Evnissyen
I liked the story, actually. Her total distortion of language (not to mention how well it rips modern culture) is truly amazing at times. The vast majority of "professional" authors aren't nearly as interesting as this....

Were I a publisher I would want to put this work into print... except I fear she might not have actually meant it as a satire.


Remind me to share horror stories with you sometime about gloriously bad novels I've had to read through for work. I'd post them here, but some of the best ones aren't fit to print. (Well, none of them are fit to print, but most for quality rather than content.)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read The Name of the Wind myself. I like it too.

 

Before that was Fragile Things by Gaiman. Overall, disappointing, in that the first few stories were the best, and the last few just bland. But A Study in Emerald (the first story) was perfect; I had just enough Holmesiana still in memory to appreciate it (you need quite a bit, I think).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Diki:

No!... dammit, they took out her Author's Notes, which was half the fun. "STOP FLAMMING DA STORY PREPZ OK! odderwize fangs 2 da goffik ppl 4 da good reveiws!"

 

I'll have to go back through it some more and actually pick out some of the extraordinary phrasings. Oh, wait, one comes to mind... something about two boys sitting on their broomsticks watching her through her window and one of them is "masticating" to her.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Evnissyen
Diki:
No!... dammit, they took out her Author's Notes, which was half the fun. "STOP FLAMMING DA STORY PREPZ OK! odderwize fangs 2 da goffik ppl 4 da good reveiws!"


What kind of mangled fake dialect is that? "da" as a definite article sounds more like Rapper English, and it should be "thx" instead of "fangs". tongue
Link to post
Share on other sites

Crown of Stars is certainly dense, but from what I can recall, which isn't a huge amount, I found its pace glacial, its characters less than arresting, and the payoffs not worth the effort to get there. It may improve, but I gave up after two or three books.

 

—Alorael, who believes this may have been one of the contributing causes of his resolution not to start an incomplete series, too. While waiting for the next one he noticed that it just wasn't worth the wait. Or rather, he could happily keep waiting indefinitely, so he has.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aran:

This is part of why I think the writing is so interesting. This includes 'mistakenly' using the lesser-known word "masticate" when she really meant "masturbate".

 

Anyhow...

 

How many people here have read Samuel Delany? And how many people like his work? I've picked up Nova, although I don't quite remember why. I haven't started reading it yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read Samuel Delany. I get the sense that he takes himself and his writing more seriously than they really ought to be taken, but they're good books so he gets a pass.

 

—Alorael, who may be unfairly projecting on Delany what he's seen elsewhere. They seem like good books, but not intense introspection-worthy books.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Toby-Linn
Yeah, the series isn't complete yet, so I might not start it until then.

I remember how hard it was to wait for Stephen King to finish his Dark Tower series, also waiting for J.K. Rowling to finish Harry Potter.


Or GRRM to finish the Song of Ice and Fire. I finally got a hold of Feast for Crows a while back after planning for years to read it. It wasn't as satisfying as I'd hoped, because three of my four favorite characters (Dany, Jon, Tyrion) were basically missing, with only Arya getting POV chapters.

But the story had some rather interesting developments, for example in having queens succeed to the throne almost everywhere.

Click to reveal.. (This reveals details of the plot of A Feast for Crows)
Down in King's Landing, Margaery Tyrell and Cersei Lannister are having a private war, and toward the end it seemed that the fortunes were finally changing. In the north, Petyr is scheming to let Sansa inherit both the Vale of Arryn and Winterfell. In Dorne, the throne will pass to Arianne.

In the Iron Isles, Asha was this close to becoming Queen. She would have been a rather good queen too, I think.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...