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  1. Today
  2. Snowwhite

    Missing Spore Baton Northbridge

    Thanks Lilith.
  3. Lilith

    Missing Spore Baton Northbridge

    In many Spiderweb games, if you have graphics settings turned down, effects such as colour filters won't be applied to items and monsters. That might have been your issue.
  4. so my computer is a little messed up and i can't change screen resolutions without it shutting down its screen. i set avernum to play in the smaller window and it works fine, but its directly in the center of the screen, and i'd like to move it slightly off to the side. I've looked through(but didn't touch) the .ini and .dat files and didn't find anything that looked like a setting for moving the window. could someone please help me to relocate the window for the game? https://imgur.com/2Z8wMQP
  5. Yesterday
  6. Am playing Geneforge 1 for the first time. Am in Northbridge and repaired the spore baton at Lahnee's place but there is no option to pick up the baton and it is not in inventory. I do not get the option to get if from Lahnee either. Reloaded a save game and got the same result. Please help. Thanks in advance Apologies - the spore baton which was supposed to be brown is not. It IS in inventory after all, it just looks like a living tool
  7. Please don't reply in threads that are six years old! —Alorael, who has no objection to your comment except timing. But the discussion is long over and most of the participants are long gone.
  8. Last week
  9. Doggie

    Cant find resources folder

    Thanks Randomizer. Right click worked on my Mac.
  10. This, I mostly agree with. Your valuations do make sense to me, but my main sticking point is how, past Level 30, you get all the discretionary points at once, rather than spread out. If you stuff a character full of Wisdom Crystals so they get from, say, Level 31 to Level 34, the end result isn't worth as much as you had it, since you didn't go through a level that gave skill points or manual stat points. Though I suppose if you're doing this, you probably already realize this issue and plan around it (even if that "planning" is "more patiently farming Mandrake" or something), so this is pretty minor. Just thought I should mention it in case some people weren't sure if they had the patience for this.
  11. EarthPhantomTS

    A:EftP - Value of Cave Lore

    Sorry to bump this, but I have a question: is the 300 coins from the Burning Fungi on that Dark Lake island counted in this analysis? Cause I'm pretty sure the game makes a Cave Lore check for that (it specifically says so, and you can miss getting the money if you kill them too early; I don't know what skill level is required though). In any event, very nice. I was always kinda "pro-Cave Lore" from the start simply because I don't like feeling like I'm missing treasure. Good to see I, at least arguably, made the right call.
  12. Triumph

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    Fixed that for you.
  13. wackypanda

    Cant find resources folder

    The Humble Bundle download will create a save folder on launch. On Windows the save folder is in Documents\Spiderweb Software\Avadon Saved Games by default.
  14. All Tomorrow's Slarties

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    I thought about SMT, but ultimately I feel like this has to be a question of mechanics as much as theme -- just as style and form are also relevant parts of an aesthetic movement. And the virtue mechanics fit Romanticism a lot better IMO than either the traditional or unique components of SMT mechanics. This is also why I thought a roguelike was a good fit for modernism, a game with shifting mechanics for postmodernism, etc.
  15. Randomizer

    Cant find resources folder

    You can try right clicking on the game icon to see if you can open the package to see folders within the game.
  16. Lilith

    Cant find resources folder

    The game keeps its saved games in different places on different operating system versions, so as long as the game launches correctly and you can save and load your game, it's probably fine and things are just arranged slightly differently from what you expected.
  17. Doggie

    Cant find resources folder

    I recently downloaded a new copy of Avadon one. My previous copies which I played years ago contained a folder called at Avadon Data with resource folder and saved files. All I got on this download from humble bumble was the game itself with no other folder? Am I doing something wrong?
  18. Lilith

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    it's maybe a closer fit than most if you're only talking about western RPGs but there are a lot of slightly offbeat JRPGs that would fit better; off the top of my head, most of the Megami Tensei franchise fits the bill, drawing as it does from basically the same creative wellspring as Prometheus Unbound
  19. All Tomorrow's Slarties

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    Whether the right phrasing is "attempts to" or "does," I think it's a closer fit than most RPGs, at the least. Is there an RPG would you want to put there instead?
  20. Lilith

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    i guess my perspective would be that it attempts to emphasize those things but i don't think it fully succeeds, at least for me; winning the game requires engaging with the mechanical incentive structure even when that runs counter to the spirit of the values espoused in the game's dialogue, and i think that's an inherent pitfall of the specific approach it took to translating its virtues into game mechanics, and that there are alternate approaches that could be more successful (although, well, probably not ones that had been developed in 1985) like, that even goes for stuff like the fortune teller sequence: i was surprised to find there were people who didn't try to figure out how it worked and then game it to pick the class they wanted
  21. googoogjoob

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    Well, like I said, you can sort of allot games based on their general outlook and thematic content to various artistic movements, but it is hard to say what an actual artistic movement would look like in the context of video games. The player's interaction with the game complicates everything, and most games design their mechanics based on what players like or know, rather than using them to make an artistic point. Mechanically, the gap between Ultima IV and Avadon is relatively quite small, while the gap between Angband and Evoland is pretty big, despite thematic similarities or differences. There are a lot of consciously deconstructionist games, but they're too disparate in outlook and the use to which they put the tools of deconstruction to really be considered a cohesive "movement": Braid has serious if confused things to say about video games in general, while Evoland has no real ambition to make a statement about the games it parodies, and is mostly oriented around what mechanics (cut down bush with sword to find coin) and iconographic elements (slime monsters) players will recognize and enjoy. Pony Island is mostly designed around what will be the most fun or surprising, and the Karoshi games use the central deconstructive premise as an excuse to devise a bunch of fun puzzles. I think the simulationist impulse in video games, in eg System Shock or Deus Ex (that is, games which model in the gameworld, physically and functionally, objects or characters which have nothing to do with the main mechanics or story of the game: a soda can you can drink or throw, a basketball you can throw through a hoop, characters who go about their business, eating and drinking and going to work without the player's intervention, etc), might be considered an artistic movement or proto-movement.
  22. All Tomorrow's Slarties

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    Maybe. My thinking there was that it emphasizes the intuitive, subjective, emotional side of things (the virtues, sure, but also the fortune-teller sequence, the codex sequence, etc.) over objective mechanics (in which it's on the lighter side). The mathematical layout of the virtues is so Schiller, and it does have the pastoral idealization of forests and tiny villages -- and even shepherds! If you compare it to other games of the time, it's hard to find another with more shades of gray; I think Blake would have approved, in context. And like Romanticism it was a deliberate revolt against, well, playing by the rolls. And actually, now that I think about it, the choices of the virtues fit the movement pretty well, too. You have Spirituality, but it's grounded in wilderness (the rangers) and represented by ankhs, rather than churches, which do not seem to be formally present (despite the previous games having clerics and churches playing a rather significant role in later games of the series). Valor, not a classical virtue, but strong here (see Byron); Humility, whose lack was a recurring theme (see Shelley); and the principle of Truth (see Keats). All of that said: pretty much none of these are perfect fits, and this list is a ridiculous enterprise to begin with, so shrug
  23. Lilith

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    i feel like the game-mechanical implementation of morality in Ultima IV is a little too black-and-white to be called properly Romantic: there's a clear set of prescribed and proscribed actions, and in practice the player is called upon not to balance potentially conflicting values but simply to do all of the right things and none of the wrong things. Blake wouldn't have approved you could maaaybe make more of a case for the Age of Enlightenment trilogy taken as a whole but there'd still be some issues with that too. the originally planned plot of Ultima VIII might have come close although what we actually got was kind of a mess
  24. All Tomorrow's Slarties

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    Well, I mean, modernism and postmodernism are ambiguous enough terms to begin with. But I think there are some games that can squarely fit into one of those boxes. Games that visibly deconstruct what it means to be a game, that's as postmodern as it gets: Fluxx goes in this category, and while it's a card game, there is a computer version -- implemented by Andrew Plotkin (!). (See, this all comes full circle.) A lot of briefly viral "clever" games go here: Braid, Pony Island, that sort of thing. One common thread that, for me, links together a lot of modernist art is an emphasis on being evocative. New forms in modernism are typically used in at least partial service of this goal. The forms are unusual, atonal, misshapen, abstract, so there's necessarily a lot of implication involved. Video games in general moved away from this the better the 3D, hi-res graphics got, though there are exceptions. Just for giggles, let's throw together a haphazard (and maybe inaccurate in a few places) correspondence of some broad aesthetic movements and RPGs, because this is what we do at Spiderweb, ain't it? Postmodernist: Evoland Modernist: Angband Expressionist: Planescape: Torment Impressionist: Quest for Glory Realist: Skyrim Victorian: Avadon Romantic: Ultima IV Neoclassical: Dragon Quest Baroque: Final Fantasy
  25. Dintiradan

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    Pretty sure everyone who dismisses walking simulators would also dismiss most if not all interactive fiction.
  26. googoogjoob

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    I don't really have anything else to say about Curses. I like it well enough, it just doesn't engage me very much beyond the puzzlefest structure. 3.5 stars out of 5. I think it's sort of interesting that a few years ago there was sort of an uproar in the popular discourse on video games about "walking simulators" (Dear Esther, Gone Home, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter), when games which are essentially "walking sims" (A Mind Forever Voyaging, Photopia) had already existed in IF for decades. I spent a while a few years ago trying to think of what a "modernism" (or realism, or romanticism, etc) might look like in the medium of video games. It is difficult given that the medium has existed entirely after the advent of postmodernism, given that essentially all commercial video games (with some notable exceptions) either deliberately eschew artistic aspirations or have their artistic aspirations mangled by the demands of what will sell, and given that there is little critical literature or coherent theory for video games. There are a lot of little independent art-for-art's-sake games, but they tend to be extremely idiosyncratic and to have limited or incoherent artistic aims. (That is, they are often just "here's a little game mechanic I came up with which I think is sort of cool, but which I have no intent of developing into a full game.") There are games and game developers which might be described as having a modernist perspective on art by analogy with modernism in literature or film etc, but it is very difficult to try to articulate what an artistic movement or set of shared ideals might look like in a video game context- because it can't just pertain to the thematic elements (the story, the art direction, the theatrical direction of cutscenes, the music), but also how these elements all come together, and how they interact with the game mechanics and the player's input.
  27. All Tomorrow's Slarties

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    What Ess-Eschas said about the ending, 100%. You don't fail -- that's the whole point! You succeed in your quest to find the map, literally by definition, because the curse breaking depends on that definition being fulfilled. I will just add that given how much the game allows distant times and places to flow into each other (thanks, essentially, also to the curse that transcends time and place) there is no reasonable way you can conclude that a map found outside the attic is not the map from the attic. Those Tarot cards are all pretty clearly from the same deck, and they are found across every boundary the game has; that goes for all the rods, too. The game is essentially the modernist moment of IF, as fits its literary ties; puzzle boxes are a postmodern thing, and can we talk about an artistic era that was once vigorous and fascinating and has now lived too long, become a grotesque imitation of itself, and needs to die, yes, please. (And IIRC, it's more like PUT STAFF IN BOX. CLOSE IT. OPEN IT. TAKE STAFF Typing that 9 times or whatever is really not much text when you think about everything you have to type when playing any IF game. There are some annoyances (like figuring out the right command to give directions to the mouse; oy) and not as many efficiencies as later games, obv, but this is such a small thing.) Also, it's definitely not the no-saves thing and I'm also pretty sure there is no way to get the last point.
  28. googoogjoob

    Queen's Wish - Romance

    There is no way for an Inform game to know whether or how many times you've saved, as far as I know. I don't think the source for Curses has ever been released, but it's possible to disassemble z-code games in a way that pulls out all the potential text you can see in the game (and any unused text), and if there was an actual last lousy point, it would almost certainly have been discovered in the time since the game came out. I'm almost certain the "missing" point is a deliberate poetic echo of the end of the story. I wouldn't say I judge the whole game on the last point thing. I still think it's a generally very good, well-implemented puzzlefest adventure game, and it's historically important for the IF renaissance it led to. It just doesn't really connect with me as a work of art in the way I find most satisfying. (Also, as interesting as the themes of the game potentially are, you are still going to spend most of the game fiddling with, like, the frustrating sliding-block puzzle, or typing out PUT STAFF IN SARCOPHAGUS. CLOSE SARCOPHAGUS. OPEN SARCOPHAGUS. TAKE STAFF a dozen times.) I think the romance with Black is good. It's underwritten rather than tastelessly overwritten in the way a lot of genre fiction romance is, and you can read as much or as little into it as you want. This might be considered a problem in that it leaves the romance sort of half-integrated with the main story of the game, but this doesn't really bother me a lot. Having the characters' genders remain resolutely undefined is a nice touch, and surprisingly progressive and tasteful for an adventure game from 1995. It's also the sort of thing you can only really do in a purely text-based medium. PS it's probably too late to save this topic, and all the stuff about art and IF should probably get shaved off into a separate topic.
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